Sunday, Lazy Sunday

Studly Doright played in a two-day golf tournament this past weekend, so I was pretty much on my own both Saturday and Sunday. I didn’t do much other than running errands and doing laundry.

On Sunday I took myself to lunch at my favorite little vegan spot, the Sweet Pea Cafe, where I enjoyed French toast with slices of bananas and strawberries, home fries, and grits. Normally I don’t care for grits, but these were primo.

Someone in the cafe was enjoying a mimosa, so after I finished my meal I decided to stay and sip on one while reading a book. Mmmm. So good. I took my time with the drink then drove home to Doright Manor where I promptly planted my butt on the sofa and proceeded to nap for the rest of the afternoon. I’m blaming the mimosa. I’m also thanking it.

Peace, people.

Sort of a Review: “Hostiles”

Rain interfered with Studly Doright’s Sunday golf game, so he took me to brunch at Southwood Golf Club where Chef Mike makes the world’s greatest egg white omelette. Mine was a fluffy concoction of bacon, onion, tomato, and cheddar cheese that was so light it appeared to float above my plate. Okay, maybe the mimosa I ordered was responsible for the special effects, but it was a stellar meal.

Afterwards we went to see the film Hostiles starring Christian Bale and Rosamund Pike. Ten minutes into the film I turned to Studly and asked, “What in the world have you brought me to see?” The beginning is so brutal I thought I was going to need to leave. But I stayed, and while violence is a main theme of the film, a storyline did develop.

Christian Bale is intense as an Army captain charged with escorting Chief Yellowhawk, played by Wes Studi, and his family to Montana from New Mexico where they’ll be set free after seven years in captivity. Along the way the small band of soldiers and Native Americans face one trial after another, including their encounter with Ms. Pike’s character.

Studly joked on the way home that he wondered if there had been more than four pages of dialogue for the entire film. I told him there was, but it was uttered in such a mumbling fashion that at least two pages could be discounted.

What is it with actors mumbling dialogue? One bearded character was so difficult to understand that I tuned out all of his dialogue. At least let me read his lips, for pity’s sake. If I were grading Hostiles I’d deduct ten points just for the mumbling.

The story was okay. There was nothing new here, as far as I could tell, but I did appreciate the way Bale’s character evolved. The scenery was beautiful and the film felt real. Just don’t go see it if you’re at all squeamish!

Peace, people!