The Assignment

Once upon a time I was a teacher. I wasn’t a great teacher, nor was I an awful one. I loved being with young people all day long, but I am a woman of little patience, and that is not a good thing when working with active children.

While I taught students in grades three through seven at various times in my career, by far my favorite years were those I spent teaching English to middle schoolers. I know what you’re thinking, “How’d someone with Leslie’s blatant disregard for the rules of grammar ever teach English?”

Shucks, y’all. I had a teaching manual. Duh. Seriously, though, before I began blogging I was much more cognizant of, and adherent to, those pesky rules. Now it’s “Rules, Shmules” most days. But this post really isn’t about me. Gasp!

One of the first assignments I gave as a seventh grade English teacher was for students to write about something important that had happened in their lives. It could be something funny or frightening, happy, or sad. I’m not even sure I placed a word count requirement on this paper, I just wanted to get to know the students better and to get a feel for their individual writing abilities.

I was shocked and pleased that those seventh graders went immediately to work, and after I’d read their rough drafts I knew that the students who wanted to share their stories with their classmates should have the opportunity to do so. Much of what they’d handed in was so honest that it had to be worth more than just a grade.

After making some editing and proofreading suggestions on each of the ninety or so papers (I taught four sections of English), I handed back the papers and told my students how proud I was to have them in my class, and that once they’d written their final copy I’d open up the floor for anyone who chose to share.

Now seventh graders are an interesting lot. I figured I’d have perhaps twenty percent of each class volunteer to read their papers. Instead, every single student shared their stories. And what an experience that became! I’m sure we spent way too much time on this activity, but my students and I bonded over these stories.

One athletic young man had us all in stitches as he told of the time he and his buddies got into his older sister’s closet and put on various pieces of her clothing, including tutus and swimsuits. and wore them to dinner, much to the horror of his sister and the amusement of his parents.

A shy young woman told of being chased by a vicious dog while riding her bike and being rescued by another dog at the last minute! By the end of the story her classmates were on the edges of their seats, cheering her on.

The story I remember having the most impact, though, was the story a quiet young man told about his mother’s illness. He and his father and sister were at the hospital visiting his mom who had been diagnosed with cancer. As the boy walked down the hospital hallway, he turned to his sister and asked, “Is Mom going to die?”

His sister became angry and told him that he just killed their mom because it’s bad luck to mention dying in the hospital. Their mother did die later that week, and the child blamed himself. The class sat silently when he finished, many were in tears. I was in tears, and I’d read the story.

The love that then surrounded that young man was amazing. Other students made a point to tell him he wasn’t to blame for his mom’s death. He knew that deep down, but hearing those words from his peers seemed to turn a light on in this child. I watched him blossom that year.

When we finished sharing, more than one child thanked me for allowing them to write about themselves. While I’d just been trying to help myself get a feel for their abilities, I got a good deal more. Extras like that are what make the profession unlike any other.

Peace, people.

Author: nananoyz

I'm a semi-retired crazy person with one husband and two cats.

29 thoughts on “The Assignment”

  1. beautiful teaching story – and wow – I was feeling the stories…..
    and side note on the note about rules – well that is a nice thing about blogging – to have freedom for light sentences and no apa style or grammar considerations – ha! although their were times I was bothered by some horrible writing – and wondered the impact it would have in my mind – seriously – but I have found that the blog posts with casual writing is actually not horrendous –
    anyhow, the writing assignment sounded win-win
    and I also liked your point about patience and teaching…. esp that age

    Liked by 1 person

      1. I would have thought the other way around – the 4th graders easier perhaps?
        but it really depends on many factors at times.
        The culture of the class of kids can play a part – so does the time of year….?

        Liked by 1 person

      2. Seventh graders got my sense of humor. I could pretty much get them to laugh and then I had them eating out of my hand. Fourth graders in general were more concrete thinkers. And had a lot more energy!

        Liked by 1 person

    1. A good quick activity to get to know your students is to have them each come up with two truths and one lie about themselves. They get up, tell their 3 things and students have to guess which is a lie. It’s a much quicker way to get to know one another and perhaps more suitable to the subjects she’ll be teaching. Best of luck to her!

      Like

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