Snapshot #’s 16 and 17

Note: This post was written several days pre-hurricane. Carry on.

Would you look at this? The faeries agreed to move in with three conditions: 

1) They can stay on the screened in porch.

2) The cats have to stay at least 15 yards away.

3) A suitable temporary home be found.

The cats were willing to give in to the distance provision, and I’m okay with the faeries using the screened in porch as long as the storm doesn’t threaten that area. 

I had two bird houses from which to choose, and after looking at photos of both, the faeries said this one would do. 


I asked if I could snap a photo so that everyone would know they were safe. While they agreed to the photo, they were surprised that anyone even knew of their existence.

I assured them that a great many folks were concerned about their welfare. 

The cats are keeping their oath to refrain from eating our guests. I’d say in the realm of human-faerie-feline relations this experiment has been an unmitigated success.

Peace, people.

Author: nananoyz

I'm a semi-retired crazy person with one husband and two cats.

3 thoughts on “Snapshot #’s 16 and 17”

    1. Oh Derrick! These sent shivers up and down my spine.
      My grandmother was an extremely rigid person in her religious beliefs. There were no ghosts. Period. You died, were buried where your soul stayed until the day of the resurrection at which time you were either gathered up and sent to heaven or bundled off to hell as was predestined. She had no patience for stories of spirits or ghosts.
      Not long after my grandfather passed away I went to her home to stay for a week or so. We were sitting in her living room, she in her rocker, me in granddad’s old rocker, and she told me that several days before my visit she’d been sitting there and felt a presence enter the room, sit in granddad’s chair and begin to rock. She said the presence stayed for quite awhile, just rocking. She could smell the faint scent of grandad’s favorite cigar (something he’d given up years before when he was diagnosed with cancer).
      “I know it was your Grandaddy,” she said. That took a great deal of courage for her to say. I know she’d not have said it had she truly not been convinced.
      His presence comforted her then went on its way. As far as I know she never experienced it again.

      Liked by 1 person

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